Follow the Second Roman Workbench Build

Quick note that Christopher Schwarz is now building his Second Roman Workbench which can be found on the Lost Art Press Blog.  Here’s the link for your convenience.  He’s just getting underway with the build now, but it’s already shaping up to be quite the bench. We’re also anxious to see how the Wagon vise fueled by a Lake Erie Toolworks wooden screw & nut will turn out as well.  Enjoy!

Announcing Our April 2016 Workbench Idea

Our April 2016 Workbench Idea is a special one featuring our new Moxon wood vise.  This comes to us from Daniel C. an accomplished chair builder from Naples, Maine who sums it up best by saying: “Your Moxon vise is tougher than a Maine boiled owl!!! Nice work.”

What more can we say, so all you chair builders out there, take a look!

Lake Erie Toolworks, Moxon Vise, Wooden Screw Vise

Lake Erie Toolworks, Moxon Vise, Wooden Screw Vise

Lake Erie Toolworks, Moxon Vise, Wooden Screw Vise

Started chair building 20 years ago. Taught by Mike Dunbar. Have a fully equipped chair workshop on the shore of Brandy pond , Maine.

Couldn’t be happier with the vise. Allows me to shape at any angle the wide chair seats with draw knife and spoke shave. Easy to change grain angles.

Can knife and shave with some force to shape all sides of the Windsor sack back chair seat. I pulled and tugged the chair seat sides with the drawknife – no problem.

Your Moxon vise is tougher than a Maine boiled owl!!! Nice work.

Daniel C. – Naples, Maine

 

Announcing our February 2016 Workbench Idea

As we roll into February 2016, we have a great workbench idea brought to us by Hakan L. from Umea, Sweden.  This workbench features a 5″ thick hard maple top along with birch legs and also a leg and wagon vise for good measure.  We know you’ll enjoy this Scandinavian beauty.

Lake Erie Toolworks, Roubo Workbench, Leg Vise, Wagon ViseWB-Feb2016-2WebWB-Feb2016-3WebWB-Feb2016-4WebWB-Feb2016-5Web

Hello!

After reading all the books about workbenches I could find and looking through a few plans, I finally built this bench in 2014.

24″ deep, 96″ long and 36″ high. Weight 450 lb.

The top is 5″ hard maple (imported from the US. Hard to come by here in Sweden). Base is birch which is readily available locally.

I have access to some great machines through my work as a cabinet maker. 36″ band saw, 20″ jointer, 24″ planer, 52″wide belt sander, and a big CNC machine to mention a few.

I’m a big advocate for hand tools and was going to cut the mortises and tenons by hand but succumbed to laziness and let the CNC do it for me.

The vise screws are from your basic kits and they are flawless. The leg vise garter is made out of 7 layers of jacaranda veneer, and I used a chain vise kit from Ancora yacht service to keep the vise parallel to the leg. There’s a linear bearing in the leg to guide the leg vise. This works great, but the shaft (being a standard cold rolled bar) is to soft and the balls in the bearing wear grooves in it.

Should have used a hardened shaft instead. The shelf is 3/4″ shiplapped birch. Each one has a dowel in the middle for steering so they are always at the same distance from each other.

Finish is 2 coats of linseed oil.

Thanks,

Hakan L.  – Umea, Sweden

New Lake Erie Toolworks Distributor – Highland Woodworking

We are extremely excited and happy to announce that Highland Woodworking is now a stocking distributor for Lake Erie Toolworks.

Highland will specifically stock our Wood Vise Screw Premium Kit which can be used for Leg, Tail, Face and Twin Screw vise installations as well as our Wood Wagon Vise Screw Premium kit with extended wooden nut to ensure a simplified wagon vise installation.

We would encourage you all to check Highland out for not only our Lake Erie vise kits, but also for the many other fine woodworking tools and products that they offer for sale.  Plus, they are just a great group of people to deal with. Enjoy!

Lake Erie Toolworks, Highland Woodworking, Leg Vise, Wagon Vise, Wood Vise Screw

 

Thread Measuring Gauge

Thread Gauge

Thread Gauge

Thread Gauge closeup

Thread Gauge closeup

Here are some pictures of a wooden thread diameter gauge that I built several years ago.  I have a couple of these for different thread pitches.  Vises don’t go out the door until they are checked with these.  It is based on the “three wire method” that machinists use to verify their threads are within tolerance, except it uses stainless steel rods and they are held in place with machined brass attachments.  The foundation of this tool is a Mitutoyo 6″ digital caliper, IP67 protected (keeps dust or liquid from getting at the internal electronics).  I often see the non IP67 calipers being used by woodworkers but I think it’s worth the premium due to the dusty nature of the woodshop.  I’m of the opinion that a finer digital caliper isn’t being made.  There is often a slight variation in thread dia. within a batch, no more than a few thousandth of an inch from our own standard fit; the looser fit vises go to more humid climates and the tighter fit go to dryer climates.  We also vary the fit based on our shops humidity, tighter in the summer and slightly looser in the winter.  Our vises are made to machinist’s standards and we think that’s important, as we want the fit between the visescrew and nut to be as tight as possible without binding.   You’ll notice the numbers written on the brass pieces, -1.9680.  These represent what the readout should say when the calipers are fully closed.  Just in case the batteries die and the zero point is lost, we can reset them with the known distance from the closed position.

-Nick Dombrowski

Thread Gauge in use

Thread Gauge in use